Decarboxylate Weed For Weed Edibles, it’s essential

Decarboxylate weed is the crucial step, especially if you are about to cook your buds (or shake – stems and leaves) to make weed edibles, which are a lot of varieties: CBD or THC tinctures, or THC infused candies, brownies, cheesecakes or whatever else eatable: find weed recipes in our cookbook app – anyway they all require the weed, the buds or shake – stems and leaves and they work good too, to be decarboxylated in advance, and packed into a butter or oil for storage and for further use in weed edible recipes.

Weed Decarboxylation

Decarboxylation (as it follows from the name) is a chemical process that removes a carboxyl compounds and mainly releases from the cannabis plant carbon dioxide which is CO2. The reverse reaction is called carboxylation and is basically a part of photosynthesis, which is the addition of CO2 to a compound.

When you cure cannabis it is decarboxylation that happens, when the THCA acid (where “A” stands for “acid” and it is not yet a THC) which dominates in trichomes in a raw plant, slowly turns to be a THC. You smoke – this is the same chemical process, but we need now to make the half-way, to generate THC, and keep it, but not to burn or otherwise destroy it. This is a simple yet comprehensive guide on how to activate THC in your stuff for cooking the best cannabis edibles from it.

Why do I need to Decarboxylate weed?

Sometimes referred as “to decarb” – sort of a fancy word:

— Hey dude! for how long d’you decarb in the oven, man?

It is already a very well known information that it’s heat you need to activate THCA in cannabis, by burning it down you convert THCA into THC, consequently the latter one is affecting the consumer’s brain in the desirable way but not THCA itself. Technically speaking there are two processes running when you bake it, firstly the THCA-molecules turn to be a THC (decarboxylation) and then secondly under more heat THC changes from solid state into gas (vaporization) and you puff it and it absorbs into body and then blood delivers it into brain and finally it hits into your mind! Bham! The same release of water and carbon dioxide naturally occurs during the drying process (curing) and the same runs but instantly when you burn one down.

It’s alright when puffing, yet it’s still recommended to decarboxylate weed for smoking too, and this is called to cure. Why so? Because it’s a waste of material: burning in flame in a blunt is too fast and too hot, a whole lot of your THCA does not react. When you cure before smoking you get more of THC in the same blunt, which evaporates completely kind-of skipping Phase-I. It’s also important to worry about trichomes’ colour when you grow as it is milky or amber by the reason.

For the edibles decarboxylation is even more critical, and without it it’ll be waste of time and material. Unless you want just a yummi, but obviously you’re not for that reason here. Long story short, the Decarboxylation will allow your edibles and tinctures to be potent.

How to Decarboxylate weed?

Basically it’s heat that your need. Not too hot to prevent THC from being destroyed and this temperature limit is 350℉ (176℃), neither too cold in order to ignite the THCA conversion into THC compound. And you wish to hold it around 220-235℉ (105-112℃) during the entire process. Because the heat regime is sooo critical, I’d recommend using your own calibrated cooking thermometer (the one used for candy-making or steaks) and be in charge when doing, consider rolling in advance before you start, hahahaha ))

Directions

The note is that the main factor is temperature. Prepare everything ready in advance, grind buds gently, do everything with care – and keep an eye on temperature. Since its value lies between 220-235 Fahrenheit (104-112 Celsius) and all will be fine. Do not hesitate to use a cooking thermometer, maybe the most useful gear for cannabis edibles. And a quick stir every 10-15 minutes may be helpful for the best decarboxylation too.

Step 1. To start it – Grind your stuff. Unless this is a trim or shake by itself already, which btw can fit to all your CBD/THC edibles very nicely (and recommended at times!) with the pretty same effect but just a bit more of stuff you need to get the same high amount of THC or CBD whatever of these two you’re chasing, or both XD

Decarboxylate weed for marijuana CBD edibles - notes, directions, edible recipes
Image – a courtesy of The Chef 420TM

Step 2. Preheat the oven to 220 Fahrenheit which is about 105 Celsius. It is always preheated for marijuana edibles. For regular edibles it is very often too (as soon as you start being a gourmet, and you are! because you read this page). Some sources state 240℉ as the main temp, anyway it is lower than a cannabis vaporization point. Keep it below 240℉, and starting from 220℉ is just safer.

Cooking slowly is always the proper approach for the cannabis edibles as soon as they are sooo critical to heat you’d better still do experiments bravely but applying some caution. Keeping notes is another perfect idea to master your skills.

Step 3. Place a sheet of parchment paper on your baking sheet and spread your cannabis trim out over it into a one fairly thin layer. It may not dry out properly if you crowd it.

Step 4. Place the baking sheet into the oven and let it hang out for 25-35 minutes. Always stay below 235℉ (112℃) it’s important. If a trim is dry enough it rarely takes longer than 20-25 min, but for a completely raw plant, it may take even a double amount of time. As many 420 Chefs, as many tricks and opinions, and you try experimenting by yourself to discover the best way of your own. It’s only you who knows your stuff well, an it’s you having preferences for your favourite CBD edibles.

Once the cannabis appears nice and dry in the oven, take it from there, and let it rest in room temperature until being entirely cooled. Now you can use your great decarboxylated weed for whatever cannabis cooking application!

CBD edibles A Ganja Girl Is Consuming Weed Pizza Passionately
Find more weed cartoon wallpapers by this link

Find out more related posts about CBD edibles, THC and other serious stuff:

Cannabis Butter Recipe, a Thimble, and a King

THC: Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol

Cultivating Proper Trichomes – colour matters!!

Discover Happy Pizza, The Phenomena of Cambodia

 

Easy tricks on Cannabis Soil you apply for better yields

This is already a small scientific job for a true hobbyist, if you feel passionate enough to maximize yields greatly by using worms, sand, clay or some your very own unique mix of nutrients. Quite an exciting quest – to design your own recipe for the best performing cannabis soil.

The Easy Guide for cannabis soil

This basic guide explains where to start from and what are the options. The first step however is to choose your basic soil, that you’ll find comfortable and most exciting to work with. Explore what is in the market, maybe you wish some specific parameters of NPK of some specific basic soil to start your experiments from. All professionally mixed soils may have different origins or the purpose, and the most of the commercially distributed cannabis soils from the grow shops contain common components such as Vermiculite, Sand and of course Humus.

1. Sand Soil use for cannabis growing

The issue with the sand soil is that it allows water to go through too quickly, it may result more frequent watering if you do not wish your plants to suffer and produce less or less potent weed in the end, and also wastes a whole lot of minerals instead of giving them to plants. However, designing your own soil, you can add sand or silt for improving the drainage properties.

2. Clay Soil use for cannabis growing

Clay is basically made of fine-grained rock material with a little of quartz (SiO2), fully loaded with aluminium and magnesium oxides (Al2O3 and MgO respectively). Clay is plastic when well moisted and hard when dry, it hosts the roots of your plants quite badly due to lack of ventilation. However you can add clay as 5-10% of the soil mass to manipulate ventilation property, when designing your own most efficient soil mix.

3. Humus Soil use for cannabis growing

Humus is the mix of organic matters like dead plants, for example, rotten fully to the end and already became a soil, so this is a “usual soil” what everybody means saying “soil”. Any regular grow shop (even if not any special cannabis grow shop but the normal flower grow shop) can offer you this very basic soil. And for cannabis this is the main material too like for any other plant.

Sometimes humus may be called compost, but to be precise the compost is the mix of humus and manure, which is the great thing too – you can guess: Cows are poor digesters, they intake about 15% and the rest 85% of yummi stuff goes into manure full of nutrients by that reason – and this is what every cannabis plant wants the most. Also manure is good for worm casting [ read below – touch this link to skip to worm casting below on this page ].

4. Nitrogen and other NPK members in Cannabis soil

Nitrogen is produced from soil matter by bacterias “converting” organic forms of nitrogen into mineral forms of nitrogen, and the latter can be consumed by plants. Cannabis plants love nitrogen and especially on the vegetative stage it helps them to grow better with bigger leaves and stronger stems. The overdose of nitrogen fertilisers may result burns on leaves and weaker plant in general (see below for details).

Lack of Nitrogen in Cannabis soil

Nitrogen deficiency is the most common weed grower’s problem with nutrients.

Older leaves become yellow or partly yellow;
The oldest of them may even get completely dry being yellow in colour too;
The veins (the vascular tissue) may get more of the red colour; Check the back side of the leaves too, sometimes they start from there on the early stage of the problem;
Younger leaves can also contain yellow areas;

These all the above indicate that the nitrogen is low and you need to add it. Nitrogen fertilisers is the easy thing widely available everywhere. This is the basic compound of the very basic N-P-K model, vital for all plants. Sea bird guano or animal blood may serve as the fast and the potent source of nitrogen for your plant.

Intoxication of Nitrogen for Cannabis plants

Big and a lot of leaves but they all appear weak and react any stress badly;
Such plants are abnormally often attacked by pests and deceases, and quite badly in the result comparing to the normal healthy plant;
Underdeveloped weak roots;
Week and too plastic stems and branches;
Small and loose flowers;
Leaves may become brown and even fall;

Any of the above symptom may mean a serious intoxication from Nitrogen, and obviously this is the sign to decrease the use of Nitrogen fertilisers for your cannabis. And of course it’s better to react the earlier possible. Always keep an eye if any of your plants starts showing Nitrogen intoxication – this is way too important. Keeping notes is also another brilliant idea to master your grower’s skills.

Lack of Phosphorus in cannabis soil – Symptoms

Slow grow or even sudden stop of any grow;
Dark leafs more blue than usual (well, they are still green but with certain blue component in the colour);
Low height of the plants in general;
Everything smaller and grim )))

However, the above symptoms may indicate that your soil require more Phosphorus now. But with the too high pH level, say higher than 7, the plant cannot intake Phosphorus efficient enough tho there’s plenty of Phosphorus in the soil. In this case – work with pH level instead of adding more Phosphorus.

Lack of Potassium in Cannabis soil

Potassium takes part in the photosynthesis process. And also participates in the synthesis of proteins and amino acids, which come from nitrogen in the form of ammonium, so the interaction between these two nutrients is vital to perform different metabolic processes of plants. Lack of Potassium is bad, and can be detected by the following visual checks:

Leaves loose colour yet quite healthy looking;
Increase in number of new branches but weak and thin ones;
Old leaves are yellow with the certain rusty colour on the edges;
Rust colour is on the younger leaves in a form of smaller stains, especially on the edges;
Too late and too short flowering stage (this is the sign for the next harvest already, mind keeping the notes of whatever you’re doing to the plants, that’s the certain way to improve your grower’s skills to the highest levels).

Potassium intoxication however is a rare problem. Potassium also provides to the soil the better ability to resist pests and undesirable bacterias. Also affects chlorophyl positively increasing its amount, and enables the cell division processes – having sufficient amount of Potassium the plant takes light better and exchange with the air more effectively. In other words, more healthy and strong plant in general you will get.

5. The Pot

The roots of a cannabis plant require space, and it is a very common mistake when roots go curving around in some too narrow pot. Give space to your cannabis, a lot of space. Recommended 8 to 15 litres pot for a plant. Give a first-class space to your plants to reach the best results from your soil experiments!

6. Nutrients (fertilizers) for Cannabis, N-P-K

As soon as N-P-K (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium where “K” comes from its Latin name and used in chemistry for Potassium) are the main elements required for the plant to grow well and healthy, the nutrients delivered to the market fit this demand nicely. They normally appear liquid in the bottle, and marked something like 12–6-6, which means 12% of N-Nitrogen, 6% of P-Phosphorus, 6% of K-Potassium. The rest may be water with or without other nutrients of the “second class” if I may.

7. Use of Worms in Cannabis Soil

Use of Red Wiggler worms for cannabis Soil, Red Californian Earthworm
Red Wiggler worm (or Red Californian Earthworm)

The recommended worms are the Red Wigglers (on the upper picture), also known as Eisenia fetida or Red Californian Earthworm, and the other commercially distributed worm good for cannabis is the Night Crawlers (in the below picture). Both images are from wikipedia. Both these species of worms can be found anywhere, the Nightcrawlers are larger in size… I dun’no, try both to see the difference, or just choose one following your feeling, whichever of them seems more romantic to you, by the picture or for real in the grow shop, they are gonna be your pets for awhile, hahaha )))

Night Crawlers worms aka Lumbricus terrestris use for cannabis plant home growing
Night Crawler worms aka Lumbricus terrestris

Use cow manure for worms

If using worms for growing your cannabis, then mind the cow manure (if the situation allows – I mean mom or neighbours)))) Both worms and plants love cow manure, as soon as cows only digest 15% of what they eat and the rest 85% goes into manure, rich as hell with nutrients by that reason.

What worms do for the soil

Worms prove life and health to the soil and consequently to the plant. They are a natural fertiliser, making the environment of your plants rich in nutrients and minerals. Worms consume the organic matter and it goes through the digestion and what is left – called worm casting. Kind of a worm poo.

Their castings contain tons of bacteria, fungi, and other serious things.

Worm castings improve the germination and the full growing process;
More of your favourite fertilizer can be used with less fear to damage the plant;
Worm castings in cannabis soil efficiently hold water and nutrients;
Worms through their castings provide microorganisms and minerals to the soil, increasing disease resistance greatly;

They are good guys, these worms, you can see that.